Sheddingdean Community Primary School

Sheddingdean Community Primary School

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Ofsted 2016: Teachers value the contribution that pupils make to lessons. They use questions skilfully to engage pupils and encourage discussion.
Ofsted 2016: The entire staff team is committed to ensuring that the school is a happy place for pupils.
Ofsted 2016: The values of the school, ‘reflective, resourceful, reciprocal and resilient’, are well embedded in the school’s culture and regularly referred to in assemblies and lessons.
Ofsted 2016: In the Early Years, adults support children well by listening to responses and asking questions that extend thinking, using appropriate vocabulary to support learning.

Notices:

Sheddingdean and Covid -19

During this period of partial closure Sheddingdean continues to be open for provision for vulnerable pupils and children of key workers. Irrespective of any partial closure or collaboration with another school, the safeguarding of all our children remains our top priority. At this time, our school will continue to support our vulnerable children and if anyone has any questions regarding this they are asked to make contact with Mrs Watson (SENDCo). Please contact the school if you have any queries.

 

COVID – 19 HOME LEARNING
At Sheddingdean we do not want our parents to feel stressed, overwhelmed or put under pressure by the work we have sent home for the children to complete.

Few points to note:
We have not asked our parents to homeschool. This is an unprecedented emergency situation impacting the whole world! Let's keep perspective. Homeschooling is a choice, which is considered, planned for and you are your child's school teacher in whatever form you choose. The situation we have could be described loosely as distance learning.

You as parents, are your child’s primary educator. If you decide that your child isn't going to engage with anything sent home and is going to spend the entire period playing in the dirt, or baking, or watching TV, that is your choice and there is nothing to stress or feel guilty about.

Facilitating distance learning with a primary aged child and working from home is a real challenge. Our advice would be if you are struggling with this - then stop now. You can certainly have activities where your child learns, but your focus is your job, and survival.

 

FAQS:

Q: My child has been sent lots of physical work. Pages and pages, hours and hours. How am I supposed to get through it all?
A: It's not a competition, or a race. We recommend you spend a maximum of 2 hours on home learning with your infant age child (YR, Y1 or Y2) and a maximum of 3 hours with your junior (KS2) age child.

Q: My school keeps sending home links and emails with more work. How do I make it stop!
A: See above. These are suggestions and ideas for your children. Use them if they suit you, don't if they don't. If you're getting stressed – stop and have a break or stop opening the emails. 

Q: X in my child's class has everything done and we've barely started. Will my child fall behind?
A: Even if everything were equal in terms of support and time and number of children (which it’s not) all children learn at different rates. In the class there's a wide range of abilities in all subjects, there's different paces and there are many children working on differentiated level of work. It's almost impossible for teachers to differentiate at the moment, so you have to do it. By expectation and by time. 

Q: I'm not doing any work with my children. All they are doing is Lego, cooking and playing outside.
A: All of this is learning. Very valuable learning. Give yourself and them a break.

Q: How can I get three different lots of work done with 3 different children of different ages?
A: You can't, so stop trying. If they're old enough, try to get them to do little bits independently. Otherwise try to do something they can all engage with, reading a story together, some free writing, baking etc. 

Q: So what's the bare minimum you'd expect?
A: This is survival mode. We need to put everything into perspective in a time like this. Don’t overly worry, just do what you can.

Q: What is the ideal expectation for the children at Sheddingdean?
A: Some daily reading every day (independent or to them or via audiobook etc)

  • Some free writing now and then. They could keep a diary or add to an ongoing comic they are writing.
  • Practical hands on maths. This could be cooking, cleaning, outside or some maths games physical or digital.
  • Some fine motor work. Lego, cutting, playdough, tidying up small toys.
  • Physical exercise everyday
  • Some art/music where possible through the week. This doesn’t need to be guided.
  • Have a stretch goal, if your child is old enough get them to carry out independent work on a project. This is great for keeping brains ticking over. Get them researching from a book or online and putting together something to present to you or family.
  • If your child is younger, lots of imaginative free play, the more independent the better.
  • Finally parents, you are doing enough. You are loving your kids and supporting them through a difficult time. Look after yourself. Minimising stress is absolutely vital in a time like this for mental health. Don't let this be something that stresses you. Only you can control that by accepting it is in your circle of control, you are the primary educator and this is all your call.

Remember: Without a storm there can be no rainbow at the end